WHOOPI GOLDBERG

Whoopi Goldberg, real name Caryn Elaine Johnson, was an outstanding actor with a resume that included everything from tragic leading roles to contentious comedy acts. She was born in New York City on November 13, 1955. She gained notoriety as the cohost of the discussion shows The View on television. The first Black woman to receive all four of the major North American entertainment awards was Goldberg (EGOT: Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony).

WHOOPI GOLDBERG
Image Source: Google

 

 WHOOPI GOLDBERG

Goldberg was raised in a housing project in Manhattan. In a children’s theatre organization, she started acting when she was eight years old. Later, as a young adult, she went on to perform in the choruses of Broadway productions. After relocating to California in 1974, she quickly got involved in the local theatre scene and established herself as a stand-up comic. She eventually created The Spook Show, a one-woman theatrical production known for its humor, satire, and drama, which she performed around Europe and the United States.

Whoopi Goldberg, a critically acclaimed Broadway production that opened in 1984, was inspired by the performance. In 1985, Goldberg earned a Grammy Award for the recording of the production. She made her Hollywood debut in The Color Purple (1985) not long after, for which she was nominated for an Oscar and won a Golden Globe.

Image Source: Google

 

Before starring in Ghost (1990), for which she received the Academy Award and the Golden Globe for the best-supporting actress, Goldberg went on to play in a number of less popular movies. Goldberg went on to make several appearances in movies and television, including a brief run as the host of her own talk show, multiple times as the host of the Academy Awards ceremony, and a role in the television series Whoopi (2003–04). She joined the cast of the daytime talk show The View in 2007 as a cohost.

Despite being known for her leftist opinions, Goldberg moderated the program’s regular arguments. The television documentary Beyond Tara: The Extraordinary Life of Hattie McDaniel was one of Goldberg’s further works (2001). She received a Daytime Emmy for her hosting when it was recognized as an outstanding special class special in 2002.

She also received a Tony Award later that year for producing the Broadway production of Thoroughly Modern Millie. Goldberg achieved her EGOT with her victory. Goldberg played a religious fanatic in the 2010 film adaptation of Ntozake Shange’s group theatrical piece For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enough, despite the fact that her planned Broadway production of the work was abandoned in 2008. Later, she created the musical Sister Act (2011–12).

Additionally, Goldberg performed in solo productions on Broadway, as well as Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom (2003) and Xanadu (2008), and she made appearances as a guest star on shows including Robot Chicken and the musical comedy Glee.

She acted as a news editor in the 2014 film adaption of the comic book series and television show Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles as well as a sarcastic pharmacist in the small-town comedy Big Stone Gap. Later, she played the lead role in the Stephen King novel-to-miniseries adaptation of The Stand (2020–2021). Goldberg also provided the narration for the true-crime documentary The Con (2020– ).

She also starred in the comedies Nobody’s Fool (2018) and 9/11 (2018), both of which are dramas about people who were trapped in World Trade Center elevators on September 11, 2001. In 9/11 (2017), she played the mother of an ex-convict who had just been released from prison (played by Tiffany Haddish).
Goldberg advocated for a number of causes, such as AIDS research, children’s rights, and human rights.

Leave a Comment